Electric Fields Exploration Open the PhET Charges and Fields simulation. Check ‘grid’ on the panel at the right. There are three bins at the bottom…

  

Electric Fields ExplorationOpen the  PhET Charges and Fields simulation.  Check ‘grid’ on the panel at the right. There are three bins at the bottom of the screen. One has objects with a positive charge, one has objects with a negative charge and the third has objects that serve as electric field sensors. In the next activities, you will use the simulator to investigate electric field behavior. As you work, keep a record of your observations in MS Word or a Google Doc. Include both qualitative and quantitative information in your record. When you finish convert the document to a pdf and upload it to D2L-Assignments-Electric Field Lab.Part I: Qualitative Observations [Summary of Data/Observations is completed individually (STAGE 1) and submitted within 72 hours from the end of lab class; Further analysis is completed together with the group (STAGE 2)]Write sentences or draw pictures to record your observations. Drag a single positively charged object from the bin at the bottom (Note the value of the charge). Place the charge on an intersection of two major grid lines. Now drag an ‘E­field sensor’ from the bin on at the bottom. Move it around in the region surrounding the charged object, observing the indicator (vector arrow) as you move it closer and farther and when you have it above, below and to either side of the positive source charge. Summarize your observations in several sentences. Put the positively charged object back in the bin and take out a negatively charged object. Repeat your actions and compare what happens now with the ‘E­field sensor’ (vector arrow), noting similarities and differences between the sensor indication with the positively charged object and the negatively charged object. Summarize your observations in several sentences. Place the sensor along one of the grid lines and leave it there. Next take a second negatively charged object and place it directly on top of the first, and compare the effect on the field sensor with that of a single negatively charged object. Add a third negatively charged object on top of the first two and observe the effect. Record your observations.Suppose you take a positively charged object and place it on top of the negatively charged objects. Predict what will happen to the magnitude of the electric field. Test your prediction. Repeat with several additional positively charged objects. Record your observations. Part II: Quantitative Measurements[Summary of Data/Observations is completed individually (STAGE 1) and submitted within 72 hours from the end of lab class; Further analysis is completed together with the group (STAGE 2)]In the rest of this activity, you will turn on the “Values” in the control panel. The unit used for the electric field in this simulation is shown as V/m which means volts for each meter. You will use the equivalent unit of N/C or newton for each coulomb for electric field. Since newton is the unit of force and coulomb is the unit of charge, then the equation relating electric field to force and charge must be E=F/q, where E is the electric field, F is the force and q is the sensor charge. 1.      Repeat the observations of combining positively and negatively charged objects on top of each other, but this time make quantitative measurements of the effects of the total charge on the magnitude of the electric field by checking the “Values” box and recording your results. Use Logger Pro (or other plotting app) to create a graph of the magnitude of the electric field (E) at a fixed distance from the source as a function of the net source charge (Q) (i.e. graph E vs. Q). Include your graph with your observation with a verbal description of how the magnitude of the field depends on the net charge. 2.      For a given set of source charges on top of each other, with the Values box checked, observe and record what happens to the magnitude of the field as you move the sensor to a location twice as far away, three times as far away, four times as far away, and five times as far away. Use Logger Pro (or other plotting app) to make a graph to determine how the magnitude of the electric field depends on the distance from the source charge. Record the mathematical relationship you find between the magnitude of the field and the distance from the source charge and include your graph in write-up, with an appropriate best-fit line or curve.  Part III: Vector Addition of Fields[May be completed fully together with the group (STAGE 2)]Clear all the charges from the space if there are any. Make sure the Grid and Values boxes are checked on the control panel. 1. Place a positively charged object at the intersection of two major divisions on the left hand side of the workspace. Drag a charge sensor to a position two major divisions to the right of the charged object and record the value of the electric field. What do you predict the value would be if a second positively charged object were placed on top of the first? Record your prediction, then try it. Were you correct? 2. Remove one of the charged objects and return it to the bin. What do you predict the sensor would read for the following situations:a) if a second positively charged object were added to the workspace two major divisions to the right of the sensor?b) if instead, a negatively charged object were added to the workspace two major divisions to the right of the sensor? Test your predictions – were you correct?Write a brief paragraph to summarize your findings. 3. Remove the charged objects from the workspace, and place a single positively charged object two major divisions directly below the sensor. How do the magnitude and direction of the electric field now compare with that in step 1?4. Suppose you were now to add a second positively charged object two major divisions to left of the sensor. Use your knowledge of geometry and the techniques you used for combining forces in mechanics to predict a value and direction for the electric field that would be indicated by the sensor. (Hint: Think of these two field vectors as the x and y-components of the net field vector and use some trig) Record your prediction, then test it. Were you correct? What process did you use to arrive at your prediction? Report your result and describe your reasoning. 5. Suppose you were to remove the positively charged object below the sensor and replace it with a negatively charged object. What do you expect for the values of the magnitude and direction of the electric field for this case? Record your prediction, then test it and record your result. 6. Remove the negatively charged object. Use what you have learned to predict the magnitude and direction of the electric field you would measure if you place a total of four positively charged objects a position two major divisions to the left of the sensor and total of three positively charged objects at a position two major divisions below the sensor. Record your prediction, then test it. Record your results. 7. Are the results of your experiments consistent with the proposition that the magnitude and direction of the electric field due to a combination of charged source objects is the vector sum of the electric fields due to the individual charged source objects? Why or why not? Record your conclusion and your evidence.  Part IV: Properties of Field Lines[May be completed fully together with the group (STAGE 2)]The while arrows in the “PhET Charges and Fields” Simulation represent the direction of the electric field at points in space around the charge(s). The ‘sensor’ is an Electric Field Vector. As you move the ‘sensor’ from point to point the length and direction change giving you a measure of the field strength and direction at each location. If you draw a smooth curve tangent to all the white arrows you will get the Electric Field Lines for the charge distribution. Examples are shown on the next page. Note (c) is called an Electric Dipole.   Using the “PhET Charges and Fields” Simulation verify the following properties of field lines. Record your process to verify and your observations. Properties of Field Lines1. The field vector is tangent to the field line at any point. 2. The electric field is stronger where the lines are closer together. (The number of field lines per unit area is proportional to the magnitude of the electric field.)3. The arrows point along the direction a (+) test charge would move. (Electric field lines begin on (+) charges and end on (-) charges. What direction would a negative charge move relative to the arrows on the field lines?  Science Physics PHYS 1146 Share QuestionEmailCopy link Comments (0)

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