first task: you will time how long it takes you to travel 80 metres, measuring every 10 m. Task: Measure out 80 m, preferably in a straight line,

  

first task:you will time how long it takes you to travel 80 metres, measuring every 10 m. Task: Measure out 80 m, preferably in a straight line, marking every 10 m. Task:Measure out 80 m, preferably in a straight line, marking every 10 m. This can be indoors or outdoors.Start at the starting line, and travel the 80 m however you like*, pressing “lap” on your stopwatch every 10 m.  *Will you walk? Run? A bit of both? At a consistent pace? Or an inconsistent pace? It’s up to you! Have a little fun with it!Transfer your data into a table of values for distance, lap time, and cumulative time. To calculate the cumulative time, add the lap times as you go down the table. Here is an example:Distance fromstarting line (m)Lap time (t)Cumulative time (s)000:00.000:00.001000:10.1600:10.162000:12.1600:22.633000:7.3200:29.95………Be sure, when you are creating your graph, that distance is on the y-axis, and cumulative time is on the x-axis. Don’t forget your units. If drawing the graph by hand, make sure your numbers are easy to read.Answer the following questions based both on your graph, as well as the graphs of the other students in the class.During which 10 m interval were you moving the fastest? How can you tell this from your graph? Calculate your speed from this segment of the graph.During which 10 m interval were you moving the slowest? How can you tell this from your graph? Calculate your speed from this segment of the graph.Choose one other 10 m segment from your graph and calculate your speed. Your result should be a speed in between what you found for your greatest speed and smallest speed.Determine your average speed for the whole 80 m.Look at the graphs of your classmates. Who travelled the 80 m at the most consistent speed? Who travelled the 80 m at the least consistent speed? Indicate how you can tell this from their graphs.Did anyone stop part way through the 80 m? If someone did, indicate how you can tell this from their graph. If nobody did, what would this look like on a graph?Choose one of your classmates’ graphs and calculate their average speed for the whole 80 m. Who had the greatest average speed — you or the classmate you chose?  second task:In this task, you will perform three different physical activities, and calculate your power during each. How powerful will you be?Choose any THREE of the following activities:PushupChin-upLeg raiseClimbing a ropeGoing up a flight of stairsLifting a heavy objectActivity of your choice, approved by your teacherYou may have noticed that each activity occurs in the vertical direction. This will make it easier for us to calculate power, as the force you exert will only be in the vertical direction.These will be approximations of the power you exert, as we recognize that there will be at least a little acceleration associated with each of the movements.Remember that our formula for power is_P=frac{W}{Delta vec{t}}And our formula for work is_W=vec{F}cdot Delta vec{d}We can therefore write_P=frac{vec{F}cdot Delta vec{d}}{Delta vec{t}} Since we are overcoming the force of gravity, we can use  in our formula as shown below. Note that this formula is a bit of a simplification. When climbing the stairs for example, you push down on the stair tread which results in a reaction force (remember Newton’s third law) of the stair tread pushing back up on you, allowing you to climb. In reality, the force that is doing the work is the force of your leg muscles acting on your bones. This is an internal force that transforms the shape of your body as you climb the stairs, but it is still doing work and the formula that is developed below will still calculate your power as you complete an activity. P=frac{vec{F}_{g}cdot Delta d}{Delta vec{t}}P=frac{mvec{g}cdot Delta d}{Delta vec{t}}So, in order to calculate your power in each activity, you will require the following measurements:Mass (m) in kg (How much mass is being lifted?)Displacement (Delta d) in m (How far was the mass lifted?)Time (t) in seconds (How long did it take to lift the mass?)Remember that vec{F}_{vec{g}} is a constant, at 9.8m/s^{2} [down] (assuming you are doing these activities on Earth!).Create a chart to track the data you collect. Use the GRASP method to calculate your power for each activity, remembering to paraphrase your solutions.Answer the following questions, then submit your answers and your calculations to your teacher. Don’t forget to check the rubric!During which activity did you have the most power?During which activity did you have the least power?In general, how could you increase your power in any activity?Why would this task have been more difficult in the horizontal direction (i.e. calculating your power when running)?  Science Physics CHE TFGH

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